Tag Archives: Desert Spear

The Daylight War by Peter V. Brett : Review

This post may contain slight spoilers for earlier books. Read my review of the first novel, The Warded Man here

On the night of the new moon, the demons rise in force, seeking the deaths of two men both of whom have the potential to become the fabled Deliverer, the man prophesied to reunite the scattered remnants of humanity in a final push to destroy the demon corelings once and for all.

Arlen Bales was once an ordinary man, but now he has become something more—the Warded Man, tattooed with eldritch wards so powerful they make him a match for any demon. Arlen denies he is the Deliverer at every turn, but the more he tries to be one with the common folk, the more fervently they believe. Many would follow him, but Arlen’s path threatens to lead him to a dark place he alone can travel to, and from which there may be no returning.

Ahmann Jardir has forged the warlike desert tribes of Krasia into a demon-killing army and proclaimed himself Shar’Dama Ka, the Deliverer. He carries ancient weapons—a spear and a crown—that give credence to his claim, and already vast swaths of the green lands bow to his control.

Once Arlen and Jardir were as close as brothers. Now they are the bitterest of rivals. As humanity’s enemies rise, the only two men capable of defeating them are divided against each other by the most deadly demons of all—those lurking in the human heart. – source

I was admittedly sceptical of this novel, because while I absolutely loved Brett’s debut novel, The Warded Man, the sequel to it — The Desert Spear failed to live up to my expectations, and was an unsatisfying read in comparison to the first; falling short of the novel’s potential. Fortunately, my scepticism wasn’t needed as Brett’s latest novel proved to be a gripping read, and a fantastic addition to its predecessors’, with its great back story and fantastic battle scenes.

One thing that I have to mention though, was that my main issue with The Desert Spear (which continues to be an issue in this latest instalment in the Demon Cycle) was the imbalance of power.

There are characters which (for lack of a better word) are perfect. They’re strong; they can deal with anything, and do absolutely anything. Arlen is especially vexing at times due to that, especially as some of his abilities begin to manifest and gain potency.

An example of this is the Corelings — in the first book, they were invincible, impossibly strong and deadly creatures, by the end of the second book they can pretty much be killed with a look. He does remedy that a bit in this novel, reintroducing the element of fear, even from the “super-powers”.

That imbalance of power can be a bit of a stint when reading Brett’s Demon Cycle. Despite this, it’s enjoyable to follow along their adventure, and his characters are ones that are easy to care about and they’re fun to read,

The Daylight War is easily one of the top 5 novels I’ve read this past year. Readers of Brett’s Demon Cycle have a lot to look forward to in February. I can say with complete confidence that Brett has outdone himself, and this latest instalment surpasses The Desert Spear, and is perhaps even better than The Warded Man (which is one of my favourite fantasy novels).

With his breath-taking descriptions, epic battle scenes (that’ll make you say “Damn! That’d look epic on the big screen” — Rojer and his music continue to be an amazing addition.), the powers that shape the world, and of course, keeping with the theme of the series, Brett tells yet another amazing coming of age story, this time of Jardir’s wife, Inevera.

The Daylight War, Book Three of The Demon Cycle by Peter V. Brett is a fast-paced, action-packed and exhilaratingly detailed novel that will leave readers breathless and in eager anticipation for more.

The Daylight War will be released February 12th.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

 


The Warded Man by Peter V. Brett : Review

When darkness falls, Demons rise from the mists and rule the night. In a frenzy they kill, devour and destroy; held at bay only by ancient wards. However, when the Corelings breach the wards; tragedy strikes. Houses and towns burned to rubble; family and friends slaughtered. There is no way to fight back; all you can do is cower in fear, hide and pray that your wards will hold through the night – and be thankful that it isn’t you that’s being devoured.

The story follows three main characters; Arlen, who after a series of events and observing a great cowardice from his father; runs away in an attempt to be free, and moreover – fight back against the demons. Arlen is ever willing to do what others have thought impossible for generations, ever since the lost wards and the return of the Corelings. He gains his talents and specialities during his quests for knowledge and the desire for change.

After escaping from her manipulative and demanding mother, Leesha goes trains under the town hag and becomes a skilled healer. As she grows older, she must also deal with the leering looks of men, and protect herself in a male-dominant society; all the while searching for the right guy. She shows great strength of character; and alongside her skills with healing, she finds herself with a will to fight.

Rojer was raised by a Jongleur after his parents were killed by the demons when he was three. Scarred from that encounter; Rojer is missing fingers, though they serve as a reminder of his parent’s love. Struggling with juggling, Rojer more than makes up for that lack with his extraordinary skills playing the fiddle – skills which may prove magical.

Peter Brett‘s debut novel, The Painted Man (A.K.A The Warded Man in some countries) at first begins like the traditional well-known fantasy story; with a country-boy in a small village. Yes, there are a few clichés in the plot like that (country boy goes on a quest to change the world), as well as a bit of predictability. However Brett does a fantastic job with making it his own. With the characters starting out fairly young; as they mature and age (the story spans about 15 years) the plot goes from the idiosyncrasies of small villages to the complexity of city-life, with the different sights, sounds and people. His great use of description allows you to experience the story alongside the protagonists and makes for an enthralling read. Brett’s protagonists are all well written, and dynamic (though, I had some issues with Leesha’s story close to the end), and they’re interesting to read.

One of the main things that stinted this story was the view-point transitions. They seemed a bit roughly done, and with the timelines jumping back and forth it could be confusing at times.

In short: It’s a great book, The Painted Man is among my favourite fantasy novels and even though it has its flaws, I found it to be a very enjoyable read. I recommend it to anyone who likes fantasy novels, action – and can deal with some of the more mature subject matter which are brought up in the story.

Though, I have mixed feelings about The Desert Spear (book 2), which wasn’t a terrible book, it just didn’t live up to my expectations and (to me) fell short of the potential it had. However, the majority of other reviews seem to disagree with me on this point.

~

Peter’s Website : http://www.petervbrett.com/
Follow Peter on Twitter : @PVBrett 


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